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Alcohol and Tobacco

Alcohol

What is an alcoholic beverage?

The term “alcoholic beverages” is defined in Code of Virginia § 4.1-100 as including “alcohol, spirits, wine, and beer, and any one or more of such varieties containing one-half of one percent or more of alcohol by volume, including mixed alcoholic beverages, and every liquid or solid, patented or not, containing alcohol, spirits, wine, or beer and capable of being consumed by a human being.”

At what age am I allowed to drink alcohol?

Age 21. It is illegal for any person under the age of 21 to purchase, possess, or attempt to purchase or possess any alcoholic beverage. (Code of Virginia § 4.1-305)

At what age am I allowed to buy alcohol?

Age 21. It is illegal for any person under the age of 21 to purchase, possess, or attempt to purchase or possess any alcoholic beverage. (Code of Virginia § 4.1-305)

What is the penalty for someone under 21 possessing or purchasing alcohol?

According to Code of Virginia §§§ 4.1-305 (c), 16.1-278.9 and 16.1-278.8:

It is illegal for anyone under 21 to possess any alcoholic beverage. Violators are guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor and, upon conviction, face a fine of up to $2,500 and/or a year in jail and/or 50 hours of community service, and can lose their driver’s license for up to a year. The court may also order substance abuse counseling and treatment.

What if a law enforcement officer finds alcohol in my possession?

He or she may confiscate the alcohol and charge you with being in violation of §4.1-305 of the Code of Virginia, which makes it illegal for any person under the age of 21 to purchase, possess, or attempt to purchase or possess any alcoholic beverage.

Can I drink at home as long as it’s okay with my parents?

Virginia’s Alcohol Beverage Control law allows a person to keep and possess lawfully acquired alcoholic beverages in his residence for his personal use or that of his family. It is illegal for your parents to serve alcohol to guests in their home unless the guests are 21 years of age or older or are accompanied by a parent, guardian, or spouse who is 21 years of age or older. (Code of Virginia § 4.1-200 (7))

Note the restrictions for anyone under 21 years:

a. in the residence and

b. accompanied by a parent.

Anyone, including your parents, who purchases for, or otherwise gives, provides, or assists in the provision of alcoholic beverages to another person knowing that the person is less than 21 years of age is guilty of a Class 1 misdemeanor. If convicted, the court may order jail time for up to 12 months and/or a fine of up to $2,500. (Code of Virginia § 4.1-306 (A1))

What if someone else gives me alcohol or buys it for me?

It is illegal for any person to purchase for, or otherwise give, provide, or assist in providing alcoholic beverages for another person whom they know to be less than 21 years of age. This is a Class 1 misdemeanor and, if convicted, the court may order jail time for up to 12 months and/or a fine of up to $2,500. (Code of Virginia § 4.1-306.(A1))

What if I use a fake ID to buy alcohol?

Using a fake ID to establish a false identity or false age to purchase alcoholic beverages is a Class 1 misdemeanor and, upon conviction, you can face a fine of up to $2,500 and/or one year in jail and a minimum $500 fine or 50 hours of community service, and can lose your driver’s license for up to one year. (Code of Virginia § 4.1-305)

Can I get in trouble for having a fake ID?

Yes. It is illegal to possess, manufacture, use, or sell an altered/false driver’s license or military or university identification. It is also illegal to loan your driver’s license or identification card to another person. Persons who possess, use, or distribute fake IDs are charged with a Class 1 misdemeanor (Code of Virginia § 18.2-204.1)

What if I drink and drive?

As part of a “Zero Tolerance” policy, Virginia has enacted some of the toughest laws in the United States for minors caught driving under the influence of alcohol. Under Code of Virginia § 18.2-266.1, it is illegal for anyone under the age of 21 to operate a motor vehicle after illegally consuming alcohol. A violation is a Class 1 misdemeanor. Punishment includes loss of your driver’s license for one year from the date of conviction and a mandatory minimum fine of $500 or having to perform a minimum of 50 hours of community service.

What if I take alcohol to school?

The school is required by law to notify the local law enforcement agency when any student has committed certain offenses, including any conduct involving alcohol. (Code of Virginia § 22.1- 279.3:1 (D))

You will be subject to both school disciplinary action and criminal action. This means you may be suspended from school and be required to go to court to face criminal charges. Anyone (whether an adult or a minor) possessing or consuming alcohol on public school property can face a fine of up to $1,000 and six months of jail time. (Code of Virginia § 4.1-309)

What happens if a store sells beer to someone under age 21?

Under Virginia law, the clerk (seller/server) and the establishment with the license to sell alcohol (licensee) are penalized. The seller/server can receive up to $2,500 fine and/or up to 12 months in jail. For a first time offense, a licensee can be penalized up to $2,000 and/or have their ABC license revoked. (Code of Virginia § 4.1-325.2)

If someone sells alcohol to a person under the age of 21 and does not require that individual to provide bona fide evidence of legal age, the seller will be guilty of a Class 3 misdemeanor. (Code of Virginia § 4.1-304 (B))

Why are there laws prohibiting use of alcohol? It’s legal for adults. Why not teens?

Underage drinking is recognized as a major health and safety threat to youth. According to the U.S. Surgeon General:

  • underage drinking is a major cause of death from injuries among young people -- from vehicle crashes, homicides and suicide, to falls, burns, and drowning.

  • Underage drinking increases the risk of committing or being the victim of a physical assault or sexual assault.

  • Underage drinking plays a role in risky sexual activity.

But isn’t drinking something teens do as a “rite of passage” and part of having a good time?

Many people are unaware of the health and safety risks and think that underage drinking is a “rite of passage.” Tragically, many young people don’t survive this rite.

According to the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation (PIRE), underage drinking is involved in:

  • 24 percent of fatal motor vehicle crashes;

  • 8 percent of non-fatal motor vehicle crashes;

  • 30 percent of fatal drownings;

  • 30 percent of fatal burns;

  • 41 percent of homicides;

  • 43 percent of sexual assaults;

  • 37 percent of other assaults;

  • 9 percent of suicides;

  • 20 percent of risky sex behavior; and

  • 24 percent of property crimes.

What are some strategies for staying “safe and sober?”

Teens have an important role to play in preventing and reducing underage drinking. Some suggestions:

1. You and your parents can sign what is called a “Contract for Life.” In such a contract, you agree to:

  • do everything you can to avoid making decisions that jeopardize your health (such as drinking and driving or riding with someone who has been drinking); and
  • call your parents if you are ever in a situation that threatens your safety.

Your parents agree to:

  • provide safe, sober transportation home;

  • defer discussions about the situation until it can be discussed in a calm and caring manner; and

  • to not drink and drive themselves.

Samples of such pledges are on the Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD) website.

2. Support underage drinking prevention efforts in your school and community. These might be sponsored by organizations such as Students Against Destructive Decisions (SADD), Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD), or other community prevention organizations and coalitions.

3. Learn more strategies by reading some of the publications and visiting the websites listed in the column on the right.

Tobacco

What is tobacco?

Tobacco is a plant whose brown-colored leaves are cured and dried. People can smoke tobacco in cigars, cigarettes, or a pipe. People can also chew tobacco or snort it as snuff.

Is tobacco a drug?

Yes, contrary to what many people believe, tobacco is a drug. By definition, a drug is a nonfood substance that can cause changes in the function of the body and/or mind. Tobacco leaves contain a complex mixture of chemicals that affect the body in many ways. Nicotine is one of the main ingredients in tobacco. It is a drug that occurs naturally in the tobacco leaf, acting paradoxically as both a stimulant and a depressant. It is the substance that causes the craving for tobacco. Nicotine can kill a person when taken in high concentrations all at once. Its action on the cardiovascular system, increasing cardiac output and raising blood pressure, probably contributes to the elevated risk of cardiovascular mortality in smokers.

At what age am I allowed to smoke or chew tobacco?

Age 18. According to Code of Virginia § 18.2-371.2: “No person less than 18 years of age shall purchase, attempt to purchase or possess any tobacco product, including but not limited to cigarettes, cigars, bidis, rolling papers, nicotine vapor products, and alternative nicotine products.”

At what age am I allowed to buy tobacco?

Age 18. According to Code of Virginia § 18.2-371.2 (B): “No person less than 18 years of age shall purchase, attempt to purchase or possess any tobacco product, including but not limited to cigarettes, cigars, bidis, rolling papers, nicotine vapor products, and alternative nicotine products.”

What are bidis?

Bidis are thin, often flavored, cigarettes from India or South Asia that are made of tobacco wrapped in a leaf.

What is the penalty for someone under 18 possessing or purchasing tobacco?

Violations shall be punishable by a civil penalty not to exceed $100 for the first violation, and $250 for subsequent violations. In lieu of the civil penalty, a judge may prescribe up to 20 hours of community service for a first violation and up to 40 hours of community service for a second violation. (Code of Virginia § 18.2-371.2)

The law prohibiting anyone less than 18 from possessing any tobacco product does not apply to the possession of tobacco products by persons less than 18 years of age making a delivery of tobacco products in pursuance of his employment.

What if a store sells tobacco to someone under 18 years of age?

According to Code of Virginia § 18.2-371.2: “No person shall sell to, distribute to, purchase for or knowingly permit the purchase by any person less than 18 years of age, knowing or having reason to believe that such person is less than 18 years of age, any tobacco product, including but not limited to cigarettes, cigars, bidis, rolling papers, nicotine vapor products, and alternative nicotine products.” Proof that the person demanded, was shown, and reasonably relied upon a photo identification stating that the individual was at least 18 years of age as required by law shall be a defense to any action brought under this subsection.

Violation by an individual or a separate retail establishment, except for the sale of bidis, shall be punishable by a civil penalty not to exceed $100 for the first violation, up to $200 for a second violation and up to $500 for subsequent violations. If the retail establishment has a youth access training program, the court shall suspend all penalties. If the court finds that there is no training program then they may impose a penalty not to exceed $1,000.

What about buying cigarettes from a vending machine?

If you buy cigarettes from a vending machine, you are still in violation of Code of Virginia § 18.2-371.2 (A), which prohibits possession or purchase by anyone less than 18 years of age. Virginia law says: “Violators shall be punishable by a civil penalty not to exceed $100 for the first violation, and $250 for subsequent violations.” In lieu of the civil penalty, a judge may prescribe up to 20 hours of community service for a first violation and up to 40 hours of community service for a second violation.

Vending machines are required to be located in a place that is not open to the general public and is not generally accessible to minors. A notice must also be posted on the machine indicating that the purchase or possession of tobacco products by minors is unlawful. Violations are subject to the same penalties provided for the sale or distribution of tobacco products to minors – a civil penalty not to exceed $100 for the first violation, up to $200 for a second violation, and up to $500 for subsequent violations. (Code of Virginia § 18.2-371.2)

If I work in a store that sells tobacco, am I allowed to sell tobacco?

Yes. Virginia law does not prohibit sale by someone under 18 years of age. (Code of Virginia § 18.2-371.2 (B))

What if a law enforcement officer finds tobacco in my possession?

He or she may confiscate the tobacco and charge you with being in violation of Code of Virginia § 18.2-371.2, which states “No person less than 18 years of age shall purchase, attempt to purchase or possess any tobacco product, including but not limited to cigarettes, cigars, bidis, and rolling papers.”

I see signs in restaurants and offices that say “Smoke Free.” What will happen if someone smokes there?

Virginia law limits tobacco use in many public places, schools, and certain restaurants. Anyone who smokes in a designated no-smoking area and anyone who continues to smoke after being asked to refrain from smoking is subject to a civil penalty of not more than $25. Any law enforcement officer may issue a summons for violation of this law. (Code of Virginia § 15.2-2824)

Why are there laws prohibiting use of tobacco? It’s legal for adults. Why not teens?

Smoking is recognized as a major health threat to youth. According to the American Cancer Society, cigarette smoking causes serious health problems among children and teens, including:

  • Coughing;

  • Shortness of breath;

  • More frequent headaches;

  • Increased phlegm (mucus);

  • Respiratory illnesses;

  • Worse cold and flu symptoms;

  • Reduced physical fitness;

  • Poor lung growth and function;

  • Worse overall health; and

  • Addiction to nicotine.

But isn’t trying a cigarette something teens do as a “rite of passage?”

Many people don’t realize how quickly a casual experimentation with tobacco can become an addiction -- one that carries with it serious health risks.

A 2009 survey from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that nearly half of high school students had tried cigarette smoking at some point. In 2009, more than one out of four high school kids were current tobacco users.

The younger you are when you begin to smoke, the more likely you are to be an adult smoker. Almost 90 percent of adults who are regular smokers started at or before the age of 19. And people who start smoking at younger ages are more likely to develop long-term nicotine addiction than people who start later in life.